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Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Wrestling, jujitsu, ground and pound or submit your opponent for the victory

Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby ejk105 » Thu May 29, 2008 10:38 pm

I just started training jui jitsui, and coming in with basic wrestling skills, I was a fish out of water. I got the shit cranked out of my neck and was mounted a few times even though I knew I was more powerul. Any tips for motivation out there for a beginner like myself, perhaps to help me keep going?
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby easycore » Fri May 30, 2008 8:32 pm

If you want to really learn jiu jitsu and you have a wrestling background, try to put that out of your mind. You are learning a different discipline, that is not to say that wrestling isn't useful, but you need to learn how jiu jitsu player's hold top positions and fith off of their backs.

If you are stronger and bigger than your training partner, don't use your strength, it will hurt your technique a whole lot, and when you do end up in a match or fight with someone your size and strength, what you learned probably won't work. After all, think about Helio Gracie, small guy kicking big guys' asses with his technique, and that is the ideal right? to get the technique down without using much effort to conserve your energy, so don't hulk out on people.

Eliminate the idea of competition from your head also. This will allow you to learn more and it should be safer, as well as not using your strength. Fighting in general, unless you area natural/prodigy, you will have to get your ass kicked a few times to really start learning, but don't just throw yourself into the fire immediately, see if you can do some drills first. Learn the positions and maybe a submission or two. When you first start rolling with people, just go for position, you need position before submission, especially as a beginner. Make sure you get your partner on board with just working for position, then move on to adding submissions. Remember to not hurt your partner on purpose and don't train with people who will hurt you on purpose. If you hurt your partner, you will have no one to train with, and if your partner hurts you, you will not be able to train. *Side note-It can be dangerous to go to other schools for a visit sometimes. If you show up and kick a few guys' asses on the mat, the next time you come or roll, they might just try to hurt you, or at least it can be like that around here. Learn to recognize someone's intent.

As a beginner, you are going to get your ass handed to you, everyone is a fish out of water at first. Don't be afraid to tap or ask people what happened when they were in this position or how something came about when you were rolling. You are learning and there is nothing stupid about asking questions when you are learning. Sometimes you will need to stop practicing so you can think, jiu jitsu is also an intellectual sport, you may know the steps of a certain technique, but you won't really understand how to do it, set it up, or how it really works. A lot of times I, and many of my training partners, have to stop and sit out for a while to think about what happened or how something works. Believe them when they say that jiu jitsu is a chess match. Ideally, you need to get to a point where you are thinking 3 moves ahead and alternate moves if they counter or block you.

That's all I got for now. I hope it helps. I don't know if everyone will agree with me, and I'm sorry this wasn't organized very well.

Let me know how training goes.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby No_Gi » Sun Jun 01, 2008 4:25 am

Everything that easy core said was right on.
I would like to add. Drill a lot. It's better to be good at 3 moves than it is to be mediocre at 15 moves.
Also, stay relaxed.

Be sure to learn how to shrimp. It is essential at all levels of the game.

Here are some good beginner tips.
When you are in your opponents guard:

1. Always stay postured up. Head up, back straight, but don't lean back
2. Keep your elbows in
3. Keep both arms inside the guard or both out. Never one in and one out.

When your opponent is in your guard:

1. Keep his posture broken. Do this by pulling his head down. You can try doing a reverse crunch by pulling him into you with your knees.
2. Try to isolate an arm.
3. Work in sequences. A good beginner sequence for guard is the Hip Sweep, Kimura, Guilletine( my spelling sux) sequence.

When an opponent has your back:

1. Defend your neck before you worry about his hooks.
2. Try to get your head and shoulder onto the mat on the side that his choking arm is not. If he has an over under grip, he is going to choke with the arm that has the over grip. So go to the opposite side. Touch your head and shoulder to the mat and try to turn into him.

When your opponent has you side mounted:

1. Keep your elbows and arms in and protect your neck.

2. Shrimp. Slightly lift your hips off the ground using the foot furthest from your opponent. Shoot your hips back away from your opponent while connecting your knee to your elbow ( the knee and elbow closest to your opponent) Don't let him get his knee in your hip.

3. If he you can't shrimp because he is too tight, create space to shrimp by bridging up by putting your feet close to your butt and pushing off them while shooting your hips up into your opponent.

4. Do not let him get head and arm control. When your opponent starts to get side mount, shrimp and block his bicep with your hand to keep your opponent from putting it under your head.

5. The goal of shrimping is to escape and get your opponent back into your guard.

When your opponent has you mounted:

1. Keep your arms in and protect your neck.

2. There are a lot of escapes and I'm sure that they will teach you some at your school. So just remember. Bridge a lot. Your opponent can not attack you when you are bridging.

I'm a beginner too. These things have helped me a lot. Good luck
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby Headhunter » Fri Jun 06, 2008 3:56 am

the best thing to begin with is always solidify your foundation. you will get a lot farther by being able to move from position to position than you will being able to pull off beautiful and difficult submissions. you want to build a solid guard and half guard and all of the variations (butterfly, rubber, etc), and be comfortable with variations people use to change position, and you want to learn how to sweep someone from side mount and full mount back into guard and half guard. i think i went 2 or 3 years using only a guillotine and an arm bar. your defense must be very good before you can ever think about going offensive because someone who is good enough with defensive jujutsu will be able to isolate limbs and go for submissions even when they are in danger. defense is everything, if you can't defend, you lose.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby XBL » Sun Jun 08, 2008 9:07 pm

ejk105 wrote:I just started training jui jitsui, and coming in with basic wrestling skills, I was a fish out of water. I got the shit cranked out of my neck and was mounted a few times even though I knew I was more powerul. Any tips for motivation out there for a beginner like myself, perhaps to help me keep going?


i know exactly how you feel. My first BJJ was a couple of weeks ago, we were rolling and my instructor caught me in a triangle in about 3 seconds, and I caught in a RNC less than 10 minutes later. Best thing to remember is that it feels weird to everyone when you start out but eventually you get used to it and a lot of the small things just become second nature. If you get caught a bunch of times, it's no big deal that's the best way to learn.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby ghostdude8 » Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:48 am

dont feel bad, i wrestled for 3 years and did judo for 2 years and i got my ass kicked my first day. people were catching me with guillotine chokes alot because i would shoot in leaving my neck exposed. your gonna learn how to defend chokes and get better at it in no time. jiu jitsu isnt something your gonna learn in 1 week, it takes time. just ask questions and try to learn as much as you can each day.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby halal pig » Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:51 pm

[quote="ejk105"]I just started training jui jitsui, and coming in with basic wrestling skills, I was a fish out of water. I got the shit cranked out of my neck and was mounted a few times even though I knew I was more powerul. Any tips for motivation out there for a beginner like myself, perhaps to help me keep going?[/quote]


just stick with it. about 2 months into it i thought i would never get it down. i was getting my ass whooped by guys i out weighed but 30-50 lbs that have been doing it as long or less than i did. ive been doing it now for a little over a year i just came in 3rd in a tournament with 23 ppl in my division. i dont kno if that is ganna keep u going but thats wat i got
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby jitzkrieg » Tue Sep 18, 2012 1:30 pm

No_Gi wrote:Everything that easy core said was right on.
I would like to add. Drill a lot. It's better to be good at 3 moves than it is to be mediocre at 15 moves.
Also, stay relaxed.

Be sure to learn how to shrimp. It is essential at all levels of the game.

Here are some good beginner tips.
When you are in your opponents guard:

1. Always stay postured up. Head up, back straight, but don't lean back
2. Keep your elbows in
3. Keep both arms inside the guard or both out. Never one in and one out.

When your opponent is in your guard:

1. Keep his posture broken. Do this by pulling his head down. You can try doing a reverse crunch by pulling him into you with your knees.
2. Try to isolate an arm.
3. Work in sequences. A good beginner sequence for guard is the Hip Sweep, Kimura, Guilletine( my spelling sux) sequence.

When an opponent has your back:

1. Defend your neck before you worry about his hooks.
2. Try to get your head and shoulder onto the mat on the side that his choking arm is not. If he has an over under grip, he is going to choke with the arm that has the over grip. So go to the opposite side. Touch your head and shoulder to the mat and try to turn into him.

When your opponent has you side mounted:

1. Keep your elbows and arms in and protect your neck.

2. Shrimp. Slightly lift your hips off the ground using the foot furthest from your opponent. Shoot your hips back away from your opponent while connecting your knee to your elbow ( the knee and elbow closest to your opponent) Don't let him get his knee in your hip.

3. If he you can't shrimp because he is too tight, create space to shrimp by bridging up by putting your feet close to your butt and pushing off them while shooting your hips up into your opponent.

4. Do not let him get head and arm control. When your opponent starts to get side mount, shrimp and block his bicep with your hand to keep your opponent from putting it under your head.

5. The goal of shrimping is to escape and get your opponent back into your guard.

When your opponent has you mounted:

1. Keep your arms in and protect your neck.

2. There are a lot of escapes and I'm sure that they will teach you some at your school. So just remember. Bridge a lot. Your opponent can not attack you when you are bridging.

I'm a beginner too. These things have helped me a lot. Good luck


I love this. I trained a couple of years ago for about 8 months and had started to get not bad. Then, after my break, I came back and had lost the fundamental concepts... Oh sure I still knew how to do a bunch of subs, but could never get into position to do any of them because my fundamentals were missing. The last couple of weeks, I have been getting dominated by literally everyone in the damn gym. I feel like technique is somewhat there, but the fundamental concepts are not. Like an incomplete puzzle. This will go a long way to re-connecting the puzzle pieces for me.

Guard passing is a huge issue for me too, and I have found a series of YouTube videos by Jason Scully to be paramount in my progress. In one of them, he specifically says that concepts will get you further than ANY single technique. I agree wholeheartedly with that.

Here's the vid in case any other beginners check this out. It has subtitles in the key points too so if you have to watch it muted (at work or whatever), its still helpful... Also, check out his channel and some of the fundamental vids. They have inspired and helped me alot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArbjYT2H ... plpp_video

It's got a stupid ad that you can skip after 5 seconds, but its worth the watch.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby LiamHillen » Mon Sep 24, 2012 8:38 am

Control your breathing , if your uncomfortable tap
[size=200][color=#00FF00]
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby jitzkrieg » Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:25 am

Also, any time I see any beginner looking for a bit of extra help, I can't stress enough how effective Roy Dean's BJJ Blue Belt Requirements DVD is for a beginner.

Everything that a standard white belt class will contain is in there. Your basic positioning, basic sweeps, basic subs, and all the little minor details that get forgotten. For a new guy starting out, or in my case a guy who had some experience, but took time off, it is invaluable. After becoming familiar with that DVD and lots of mat time to develop the muscle memory, I suggest moving on to Saulo Ribeiro's DVD and then Demian Maia's. I'm not there yet, as some of the stuff in there is still a bit too advanced for me.

My head instructor said something pretty profound to the class last week. He said "If you want to get better faster, you need to be a student OUTSIDE the gym as well"

True words.
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby LiamHillen » Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:43 pm

jitzkrieg wrote:My head instructor said something pretty profound to the class last week. He said "If you want to get better faster, you need to be a student OUTSIDE the gym as well

Image
[size=200][color=#00FF00]
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby jitzkrieg » Tue Sep 25, 2012 9:05 am

LiamHillen wrote:
jitzkrieg wrote:My head instructor said something pretty profound to the class last week. He said "If you want to get better faster, you need to be a student OUTSIDE the gym as well

Image



That is an awesome gif. I half-expected Grizzly Adams, but you picked the right one
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Re: Tips for beginners in Jui Jitsui

Postby LiamHillen » Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:25 am

jitzkrieg wrote:
LiamHillen wrote:
jitzkrieg wrote:My head instructor said something pretty profound to the class last week. He said "If you want to get better faster, you need to be a student OUTSIDE the gym as well

Image



That is an awesome gif. I half-expected Grizzly Adams, but you picked the right one

:lol: I prefer this one
[size=200][color=#00FF00]
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